“In a single glance our souls can be flooded with the most profound reflections – no effort of memory. Everything summed up

in a single instant.” – Gauguin

moments of noticing

-a conversation with the artist:

 

Tell me about the meaning behind your work.

“My work is about joy. It is about the practice of intentionally noticing and connecting to the beauty all around us: a reflection on water, the summer evening light illuminating a farm, or the contrast of whitewashed dwellings with the cobalt-colored ocean. I feel a deep and soulful response to this simple kind of beauty. It is profoundly personal. This is what I am responding to...this is why

I paint. I love the beauty of Central Park and its ability to restore the souls of city dwellers. I find joy in noticing the details of the hand carved stone stairways there. This is not about painting a pretty thing. This is a connection felt in a single glance.”

 

Which artists have inspired you?

“Matisse - because I feel a similar emotional connection to his work.

I find it so joyful with a palatable energy, like Sargent’s painting of girls lighting lanterns among the lilies on a summer night. It is magical. I am also drawn to Oldenburg’s giant soft sculptures, Calder’s circus sculptures and Cristina Camacho’s layered paintings. While I was working as a docent at the Honolulu Museum of Art,

I fell in love with Japanese wood block prints and the imperial paintings of India. And, I was so fortunate to have access to such extraordinary art while living in New York City. It’s hard to choose!”

 

Tell me about your process, and why you add additional planes to your pieces.

“I was a creative kid growing up on a farm in eastern Montana.

I made things, I sewed…I had a very active imagination. After graduating from the University of Montana, I worked in visual design and created large-scale props, some of which were animated – like

8’ -10’ tall flowers made of concrete, wire and fabric. So, I had a strong background in sculpture when I went back to pursue an art degree at the University of Hawaii. While there I fell in love with paint and painting. Later, I began to merge the two mediums – painting and sculpture. I love the challenge of adding additional planes to a traditional painting and the intriguing results. I started with huge three-dimensional pieces meant for children, many of which are in children’s hospitals today. Then I moved into a more traditional approach with the addition of more subtle elements. I love the unexpected. I feel that it engages and draws people more deeply into the pieces. I feel so much joy in my work and I am so honored when others feel it too.”

 

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A Conversation with the Artist

“In a single glance our souls can be flooded with the most profound reflections – no effort of memory. Everything summed up

in a single instant.” – Gauguin

moments of noticing

-a conversation with the artist:

 

Tell me about the meaning behind your work.

“My work is about joy. It is about the practice of intentionally noticing and connecting to the beauty all around us: a reflection on water, the summer evening light illuminating a farm, or the contrast of whitewashed dwellings with the cobalt-colored ocean. I feel a deep and soulful response to this simple kind of beauty. It is profoundly personal. This is what I am responding to...this is why

I paint. I love the beauty of Central Park and its ability to restore the souls of city dwellers. I find joy in noticing the details of the hand carved stone stairways there. This is not about painting a pretty thing. This is a connection felt in a single glance.”

 

Which artists have inspired you?

“Matisse - because I feel a similar emotional connection to his work.

I find it so joyful with a palatable energy, like Sargent’s painting of girls lighting lanterns among the lilies on a summer night. It is magical. I am also drawn to Oldenburg’s giant soft sculptures, Calder’s circus sculptures and Cristina Camacho’s layered paintings. While I was working as a docent at the Honolulu Museum of Art,

I fell in love with Japanese wood block prints and the imperial paintings of India. And, I was so fortunate to have access to such extraordinary art while living in New York City. It’s hard to choose!”

 

Tell me about your process, and why you add additional planes to your pieces.

“I was a creative kid growing up on a farm in eastern Montana.

I made things, I sewed…I had a very active imagination. After graduating from the University of Montana, I worked in visual design and created large-scale props, some of which were animated – like

8’ -10’ tall flowers made of concrete, wire and fabric. So, I had a strong background in sculpture when I went back to pursue an art degree at the University of Hawaii. While there I fell in love with paint and painting. Later, I began to merge the two mediums – painting and sculpture. I love the challenge of adding additional planes to a traditional painting and the intriguing results. I started with huge three-dimensional pieces meant for children, many of which are in children’s hospitals today. Then I moved into a more traditional approach with the addition of more subtle elements. I love the unexpected. I feel that it engages and draws people more deeply into the pieces. I feel so much joy in my work and I am so honored when others feel it too.”

 

BLOG SECTIONS